The group of women weavers of textile art of El Hato joins the RAIZS project promoting fair trade craftsmanship and appreciation of Mexican folk art.

The group was initiated by Wendy Cao Romero, promoter of the culture of southern Veracruz. In 1992, launched a group of women to which taught them weaving techniques such as knitting, then they began to produce clothing for men, women and children used mainly for the fandango dance (genre and traditional dance in southern Veracruz, accompanied mainly by " jarocho sound ").

Gender inequalities lead to gender violence, common in these remote areas, where the man is the one who has to provide economic support in the home, this was one of the situations that this collective wanted to fight against. Over time, the economic empowerment of this group of women, combined with the many followers of the pieces produced, has been palpable and has led to more women joining this project. Now, there are 28 women who have achieved their own economic development and autonomy, but more than that their objective "is to transmit to their daughters that they have value in society and that with perseverance can achieve many things and improve their living conditions" - says one of them. El Hato is a community located in the region of Santiago Tuxtla in the southern state of Veracruz, a few minutes from the archaeological site of Tres Zapotes, which has traces of the Olmec culture that settled hundreds of years ago in the area that also hosts the archaeological museum "Tres Zapotes".

In this region ofState of VeracruzAs in other parts of Mexico, the role of women in society is dedication to household chores and childcare. This project aims to promote the socio-economic empowerment of women, as it gives them security and strength with which they can build important things and that their work is essential to achieve a more inclusive and just society.

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